epode strophe antistrophe

(Poetry) a type of lyric poem composed of couplets in which a long line is followed by a shorter one, invented by Archilochus. [1], It has the nature of a reply and balances the effect of the strophe. ‘In some strophes of the poem I tried to depict the tempest, followed by the calm of the sea.’ It examines its subject from both an emotional and an intellectual perspective. Irregular Odes have some of the elements (usually tone and subject) of the classic odes (either Pindaric or Horatian), while they are free in experimenting with rhyme and structure. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. The word is from the Greek epōidós, “sung” or “said after.”. An ode is a lyrical poem that expresses praise, glorification, or tribute. It has the nature of a reply and balances the effect of the strophe. The strophe and antistrophe have the same meter and length; while the epode has a different meter and length. "Strophe" and "antistrophe" are ways of referring to the metrical or rhythmical pattern of a text which was originally sung. Strophe and Antistrophe are two major elements of the ode, a type of lyric poetry. noun the part of an ancient Greek choral ode answering a previous strophe, sung by the chorus when returning from left to right. ?, adj., singing to, sung or said after, fr. Epode definition is - a lyric poem in which a long verse is followed by a shorter one. Strophic poetry is to be cont Epode definition: the part of a lyric ode that follows the strophe and the antistrophe | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples Disease and Sorrow's weeping Train, The antistrophe (the counterturn) is the next segment. (Poetry) the part of a lyric ode that follows the strophe and the antistrophe. The term...…, Antistrophe, in Greek lyric odes, the second part of the traditional three-part structure....…. The word is from the Greek epōidós, “sung” or “said after.”. The strophe and antistrophe are written in exactly the same structure or frame, at the discretion of the poet. (etc. In Oedipus Rex, the strophe and the antistrophe project the two sides of a debate in the mind of the characters. Epode, a verse form composed of two lines differing in construction and often in metre, the second shorter than the first. These have first a strophe of undetermined length, then an antistrophe identical in structure with the strophe, and then an epode, different in structure from the strophe and antistrophe. n strophe In ancient prosody: A system the metrical form of which is repeated once or oftener in the course of a poem; also, a stanza in modern poetry. Epode — Epode, griech., in der antiken Lyrik Theil eines Liedes, auf Strophe und Antistrophe folgend und eine rhythmische Abtheilung schließend. How to say strophe. ), When the sections of the chorus have ended their responses, they unite and close in the epode, thus exemplifying the triple form, in which the ancient sacred hymns of Greece were coined, from the days of Stesichorus onwards. 3). Irregular odes … phe (ăn-tĭs′trə-fē) n. 1. Antistrophe (Ancient Greek: ἀντιστροφή, "a turning back") is the portion of an ode sung by the chorus in its returning movement from west to east, in response to the strophe, which was sung from east to west. In the play Oedipus Rex, the strophe (the left turn) refers to the first stanza of the Choral ode. Basically, the antistrophe picks up the pattern of the strophe, more or less as the melody and rhythm of the first "verse" of a modern song is picked up in the second "verse", and then in the third "verse", etc. The epode is often omitted, so there may be a series of strophe-antistrophe pairs without intervening epodes. Pindar was an Ancient Greek lyric poet from Thebes. The term has been extended to also mean a structural division of a poem containing stanzas of varying line length. epode. Thus, in Gray's ode called "The Progress of Poesy" (excerpt below), the strophe, which dwelt in triumphant accents on the beauty, power and ecstasy verse, is answered by the antistrophe, in a depressed and melancholy key:[1], Man's feeble race what ills await, Once the inciting action of the play is underway, the chorus then also comments on the events taking place, in some cases even speaking directly to the characters. And Death, sad refuge from the storms of Fate, Updates? a lyric poem in which a long verse is followed by a shorter one; the third part of a triadic Greek ode following the strophe and the antistrophe… Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. A strophe is a poetic term originally referring to the first part of the ode in Ancient Greek tragedy, followed by the antistrophe and epode. the movement performed by the chorus while singing an antistrophe. Epoden, … Epode (After-Song): The epode is in a different, but related, meter to the strophe and antistrophe and is chanted by the chorus standing still. Listen to the audio pronunciation in the Cambridge English Dictionary. a kind of lyric poem, invented by Archilochus, in which a long verse is followed by a short one. ( ˈɛpəʊd) n. 1. The antistrophe is in the same meter as the strophe. (a) The after song; the part of a lyric ode which follows the strophe and antistrophe, -- the ancient ode being divided into strophe, antistrophe, and epode. Strophe and Antistrophe in Oedipus Rex: Sophocles' play Oedipus Rex has four odes. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica. In its original Greek setting, "strophe, antistrophe and epode were a kind of stanza framed only for the music," as John Milton wrote in the preface to Samson Agonistes, with the strophe chanted by a Greek chorus as it moved from right to left across the skênê. Antistrophe is the portion of an ode sung by the chorus in its returning movement from west to east, in response to the strophe, which was sung from east to west. Epode (After-Song): The epode is in a different, but related, meter to the strophe and antistrophe, and is chanted by the chorus standing still. Corrections? Strophic poetry is to be contrasted with poems composed line-by-line non-stanzaically, such as Greek epic poems or English blank verse, to which the term stichic applies. In Greek lyric odes, an epode is the third part of the three-part structure of the poem, following the strophe and the antistrophe. Epode, a verse form composed of two lines differing in construction and often in metre, the second shorter than the first. F. ['e]pode. See {Ode}.] 2. Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). ? Strophe A strophe is a poetic term originally referring to the first part of the ode in Ancient Greek tragedy, followed by the antistrophe and epode. ; n strophe In a narrower sense— The former of two metrically corresponding systems, as distinguished from the latter or antistrophe. 3. a. Mr. Peaslee's reflections rose in a strophe of hope and fell in an antistrophe of despair. The motion toward the left, they called antistrophe, from ὰντὶ, "against", and στροφὴ, of στρέφω, "I turn". Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree.... Ode, ceremonious poem on an occasion of public or private dignity in which personal emotion...…, Strophe, in poetry, a group of verses that form a distinct unit within a poem. ; n strophe The fourth part of the parabasis and first part of the epirrhematic syzygy. the second of two metrically corresponding systems in a poem.Compare strophe (def. Epode Ep"ode, n. [L. epodos, Gr. A strophe (/ˈstroʊfiː/) is a poetic term originally referring to the first part of the ode in Ancient Greek tragedy, followed by the antistrophe and epode. In the second Antistrophe the Bard thus marks the progress of Poetry. the part of a lyric ode following the strophe and antistrophe and composing with them … The epode is often omitted, so there may be a series of strophe-antistrophe … to sing: cf. noun Classical Prosody. ?, fr. Britannica Quiz. The antistrophe is in the same meter as the strophe. Like in the following excerpt, the phrase“but it is not this day” comes repeatedly at the end: (The Return of the King, by J. R. R. Tolkien) Most readers today encounter strophe and antistrophe in Ancient Greek plays such as “Oedipus the King” and “Antigone.” The strophe and antistrophe are delivered by the chorus, who offer commentary throughout the play. For the use of antistrophe in, Learn how and when to remove this template message, Cyclopædia, or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Antistrophe&oldid=897942301, Articles lacking in-text citations from January 2009, Articles containing Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text, Wikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica with Wikisource reference, Wikipedia articles incorporating text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, Wikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the 1728 Cyclopaedia, Wikipedia articles incorporating text from Cyclopaedia, Wikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the 1728 Cyclopaedia without an article title parameter, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 20 May 2019, at 10:26. Antistrophe was also a kind of ancient dance, wherein dancers stepped sometimes to the right, and sometimes to the left, still doubling their turns or conversions. Irregular odes follow neither the Pindaric form nor the Horatian form. In Ancient Greek theater, the chorus initially provides important background information for the audience so that we may understand the context in which the characters find themselves. The metrical scheme of this sonnet is … This article is about art form. The second division of the triad of a Pindaric ode, having the same stanza form as the strophe. For example, in Sophocles' "Antigone," the chorus advise… Irregular ode. Epode, in verse, is the third part of an ode, which followed the strophe and the antistrophe, and completed the movement. The part of a choral ode in classical Greek drama following the strophe and antistrophe and sung while the chorus is standing still. The term has been extended to also mean a structural division of a poem containing stanzas of varying line length. Template:Multiple issues A strophe forms the first part of the ode in Ancient Greek tragedy , followed by the antistrophe and epode. Antistrophe ( Ancient Greek: ἀντιστροφή, "a turning back") is the portion of an ode sung by the chorus in its returning movement from west to east, in response to the strophe, which was sung from east to west. The odes have complex stanza structure. The triad is concluded by both choruses singing the epode. 'Horatian' ode or the complex system of strophe, antistrophe and epode of the 'Pindaric' ode, 131 ff. Omissions? Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia n epode In ancient prosody: A third and metrically different system subjoined to two systems (the strophe and antistrophe) which are metrically identical or corresponsive, and forming with them one pericope or group of systems. stanza, strophe, stave, canto 1.1 A structural division of a poem containing stanzas of varying line-length, especially an ode or free verse poem. How to pronounce strophe. Prosody. The second stanza, and those like it, in a poem consisting of alternating stanzas in contrasting metrical form. Of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, his work is the best preserved. Classic odes date back to ancient Greece, and they contain three sections: a strophe, an antistrophe, and an epode—effectively a beginning, middle, and end. The response or antistrophe is sung or chanted from the chorus on the other side of the stage. Click to see full answer. 2. ‘The strophe and the antistrophe had the same number of lines, and the meter was also the same; the epode had a different number of lines and a different meter.’ Origin Mid 16th century (as a term in rhetoric denoting the repetition of words in reverse order): via late … This ode consists of strophe, epode, antistrophe, and second epode. The term has been extended to also mean a structural division of a poem containing stanzas of varying line length. As Milton says: "strophe, antistrophe and epode were a kind of stanza framed for the music then used with the chorus that sang".[1]. The Principles of English Versification. to sing to; 'epi` upon, to + ? The epode must change in structure. Learn more. In Greek lyric odes, an epode is the third part of the three-part structure of the poem, following the strophe and the antistrophe. Antistrophe is a derivative of a Greek word that means “turning back.” It is a rhetorical device that involves the repetition of the same words at the end of consecutive phrases, clauses, sentences, and paragraphs. Labour, and Penury, the racks of Pain, (Poet.)

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